Author Topic: Discussions about DPF  (Read 57751 times)

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Offline mareng73

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Re: Discussions about DPF
« Reply #90 on: July 16, 2016, 11:18:26 pm »
Why cannot all garages be as clean tidy as Motorcity in Leeds?
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Offline Willpower

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Re: Discussions about DPF
« Reply #91 on: July 17, 2016, 08:30:13 am »
Why not give them a thumbs up    here     http://www.mazda6forums.co.uk/index.php?board=17.0   so that others can be confident in going there ?
Look at life through the windscreen, not the rearview mirror.

Offline Kryz_w

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Re: Discussions about DPF
« Reply #92 on: August 22, 2016, 07:50:19 pm »
Hi folks

I brought a ten year old Mazda 6 2.0 Diesel and almost immediately got the dreaded DPF light.  Brought the car fairly cheaply (£1.2k, with 103k on the clock), but wanted something for motorway driving, as I was moving from London to Birmingham.  I got the place I brought it from to do a regen, and that fixed it for a short time but it came back (ironically whilst I was on a motorway) a week or so later.

Stayed on for the next few weeks (in which time I went up and down the motorway London to Birmingham about six times) until I took it to a garage in Brum this weekend, where he plugged it into the diagnostics and reset the data for me.  DPF light off, but I don't hold out to much hope for the future.

As you can guess from the price I brought it at this isn't a car I want to spend money on and am more concerned about safety than anything else.  So question is, if the DPF light comes back on am I safe to carry on driving - as I said I don't really care if the car stops working?

Thanks

Offline Flibbertygibbert

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Re: Discussions about DPF
« Reply #93 on: September 13, 2016, 02:19:29 am »
Wouldn't a lot of problems be solved by manufacturers putting something in place where the cars trip computers actually tell you that it is performing a Regen and when it is complete etc and when it is needed. ie like Error DPF at 40% please drive above 2k RPM for more than 20mins. Then a countdown to completion? Just so drivers have an idea what the hell is going on. I have a 2.2 Sport 2011 and have no idea when it does this.

Offline Mahindinho

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Re: Discussions about DPF
« Reply #94 on: November 22, 2016, 02:00:47 pm »
Hi. I've been meaning to write this up for the last few months. I've got a 2007 2.0D, the last of the Mk I's. It's been a damn fine car, and it's now done 120k miles.

The only problem with it has been the dreaded DPF light. Over the last two years, it's been a real pain. I do 14,000 miles a year which includes a 20-minute blast down the motorway every weekday morning, and a 1hr+ motorway journey at least every two weeks. So why the hell do I have a problem?!

The DPF light usually starts flashing when I'm driving from Manchester to London, roughly when I get to Birmingham. Surely that's a really odd time for the DPF to need a regen? The car would lose power, as though the turbo was being cut, and eventually the damn light would start flashing.

I should point out that, as far as I know, I've never had to do a standard regen as the light never comes on without flashing. If you see what I mean.

Anyway, I found out how to "hotwire" a full regen, so that's what I did a couple of times. Didn't work. I tried various DPF cleaners, including 3 cans of Forté recommended by a mechanic friend. Didn't work.

So I finally bit the bullet earlier this summer and took it to RRG Mazda in Stockport. They said that, yes, my DPF was buggered so they'd take it out and clean it for £500 -- if that didn't work, they'd knock the £500 off a new one. Fair enough. I swore under my breath and gave them the money.

It didn't work, and the replacement turned out to cost £2000 -- WHAT?! No way I'd be doing that for a car worth about £1500, so I bought an OBD scanner (which I can highly recommend) and decided that I'd just reset the damn thing and look for a new car.

Then I remembered AS Cars, a Mazda 6 specialist in Middlewich, Cheshire (http://www.as-cars.co.uk/). I'd found them online a few years ago when looking for some replacement wheel nuts, and they seemed to do a roaring trade in breaking and servicing Mazda 6's. I spoke to them on the phone, and they said that they'd take a look when I brought the car in for a service -- it was due one anyway.

I told the chief mechanic the OBD codes I was getting -- think one was 0299, but I can't remember the other. He came back five minutes later to tell me that my turbo hoses had split, and that could be the cause. They replaced them as part of the service (which was nice), AND I'VE NOT HAD ANY PROBLEMS SINCE!!!

In fact, the car now feels like it did six years ago when I bought it. I've done 3000 miles since then without a glitch. BRILLIANT!

So, if your light is flashing, look beyond the standard "your DPF's buggered" diagnosis and check your hoses. I'm especially disappointed that a main dealer didn't spot the problem.

Since then, I've taken the car back to AS Cars for an MOT. That, plus a new (well, second hand) wheel and tyre, new front suspension gaiter, new rear pads, new hatch bootlid struts and some welding on the exhaust came up to £230. They'll be seeing a lot of my car in the future  :)

Offline stevem100

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Re: Discussions about DPF
« Reply #95 on: November 25, 2016, 12:23:33 pm »
YEP well done  :)It just shows not all garages and dealers are the same  >:( IT PAYS TO LOOK AROUND. The good ones are out there somewhere  :) And when you find one stick with them and sing there praises  ;D LET OTHER OWNERS KNOW STOP THEM GETTING MUGGED.
cheers steve  8)

Offline Desmond Beattie

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DPF regeneration
« Reply #96 on: February 20, 2017, 03:21:57 pm »
Hi all.
I have a 2012 2.2D hatch which I bought to tow a caravan. I have noticed that it often goes into regeneration, around every 10 days or 300 miles although some times sooner. My type of mileage should be good for a deisel being mostly motorway and dual carriageway with very little town driving. I had the dealer take it in for a forced regen, oil and filter change. They said they checked all sensors and all was correct. I checked the oil level (cold) and was 1mm below the full mark. It's now 3 mm above full. Today after a short stop (15 mins ) I restarted the car and it shuddered badly for several seconds. On the way home it went into regen and was still in regen when I arrived home. I restarted the car about another 15mins later and the shuddering happened again. Took it for a long drive, high rev lowish speed until regen completed. No more shuddering. My question is how frequently should regen take place that would be considered acceptable and is it normal to get shuddering on restarting during a regen.  Secondly does anyone know why it states in the Canadian manual for this car that it states it is not suitable for towing!

Offline apav

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Re: DPF regeneration
« Reply #97 on: February 21, 2017, 11:00:52 am »
Do you get the DPF light on  when you mention that the DPF regenerates?

The 300 miles distance for regeneration is about right. It depends on how much the DPF is full but the days do not matter.

The DPF needs to regenerate despite driving on the open road. This is nothing to worry about.

Was it necessary to do the forced regeneration? Did you ask the dealer to give you the readings from the DPF? Be aware that the forced regeneration is not good for the car and if it is not necessary, you should not do it.

The oil level increases but that depends on how the engine operates. Has your car done the work for the injectors and the timing chain?

Does the shuddering regenaration happen with the DPF light on and then it goes off? Any distance around the 200 miles mark is where the DPF needs to regenate if your driving was not good for the DPF. The engine does not operate smoothly when it regenates but it should not be something excessive. What did the dealer advise you on this matter?

I have no idea why the Canadian car cannot tow but the European car can. Just follow the guidelines with regards the max weights.

Offline Desmond Beattie

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Re: DPF regeneration
« Reply #98 on: February 21, 2017, 07:32:23 pm »
Thanks apav for your prompt reply.  No I do not get the DPF light on the dash, I just recognise the sudden increase in fuel consumption which falls to around 25mpg for around 10 to 15 mins for no obvious reason. The forced regen was something the garage requested to do after I complained about fast rise in sump oil. The oil was between the full mark and the 'X' mark on the dip stick taken 10mins after completing a long journey. The car had just had an oil and filter change 400 miles previously.
The shuddering effect I put down to having stopped during a active regen and resuming my journey 10 mins later. I had assumed that there was excess fuel in the cylinders that caused rough starting and shuddering but maybe I am wrong on that one. I am not sure about what you mean about the injectors and the timing chain. I am aware that the chain is meant to be checked every service by interrogation of the engine management system ( I assume the dwell angle of the valves ?). Has there been a recall about this?. The agent has discussed driving technique and advises driving above 2000rpm for 10-20 mins regularly which I assume once a week will suffice. Again thanks for your help apav.

Offline apav

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Re: DPF regeneration
« Reply #99 on: February 22, 2017, 08:27:33 am »
I have the 2.0 and I notice this vibration more when the car is close to a service. I have a feeling that closer to the service, the oil has most of its useful life completed and the regenerations are not as effective as before.  I am due the second service since I got it, I am almost at 100K miles. I notice the instant consumption increase as well but I have never seen the DPF light flashing except for the service. I have switched off the car with increased instant consumption on the display and the next time I started it, it was either fine or made a slight vibration. Even when it was fine, after driving for a few miles, the regeneration started again. I consider all that normal as long as I see no DPF. I just pay attention to the behaviour of the car and I do not push it.

I have the impression that the dealer fetched out an unnecessary forced regeneration. If there was a DPF light on, I would do it but not without it. Somebody else with your engine has written about his experience with the leaking injectors. There is extra fuel which destroys the quality of the oil and that causes extra problems. One of them was that the DPF was trying to regenerate all the time and it ended up blocked by a film of waste which he jet washed. After fixing the injectors, the oil quality improved. If you keep servicing at the dealer, they will notify you about the timing chain. There is no official recall but when you argue your case, they cover part of the cost. There are many stories written in here but each of them is different. So it is down to the dealer level.

I am not sure about the dealer's driving suggestions. I use the car on the weekends only. I drive 2 miles to the supermarket and 2 miles back, I then do a 46 miles return trip to the country side, including 5+5 miles getting out and back in the city, and then the next day I just drive away from the city, mostly with minimal traffic but this is unpredictable. I never cruise more than 1,500 rpm and I occasionally go around the 2,000 mark to deal with a steep hill. I never push the car or anything like that. I got the car with 76K miles and it is now 99K miles and overall I have a 66mpg consumption calculated manually. My average consumption in the display was 36mpg and it has now climbed to 53mpg without any resets in between. It keeps increasing by 0.2-0.3mpg every 1K miles I add on the clock. I have never seen the DPF flashing other than the 87.5K miles service. According to the dealer my car should not work properly but it does. In my opinion, as long as you drive on open road with constant load, without the need to stop start driving, braking and accelerating all the time, the engine produces enough heat energy to regenerate the DPF. On top of that, the engine management does the trick with the increased fuel to cover any other case. Another thing that helps the DPF is not to go on full throttle but be a bit patient when the car does not have the power to accelerate.

The manual states that you have to drive more than 9mph, not less than 10mins and not to idle for long time. It says about the 2,000rpm in combination of speed more than 25mph. When I bought the car, it was displaying an average speed of 22mph. This is below the recommended speed for a healthy DPF. Despite my gentle low rpm driving, the car was regenerating a lot at the start, I could notice this from the exhaust cool down when I was turning off the engine, but gradually it stopped doing that and the engine operates more smoothly. Now the average speed in the display has been increased to 30mph without any reset since I bought the car. Also, I do not know what oil the dealer used when I bought the car, Castrol he said but with no details, but when I changed it with ACEA C1 at the service, I noticed that the car since then is working better and the consumption has been improved. From what you are saying, I would not worry about the DPF. Just check your oil level. If your average speed in the display is more than 25mph, you are doing enough to keep the DPF clean. There is a reader which you can buy and display your DPF fullness in a phone or a similar device. I do not have that but others have written about that and they have said that the DPF goes close to full and then to almost empty. So I think my driving is helping the DPF to do that.

Offline Desmond Beattie

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Re: DPF regeneration
« Reply #100 on: February 22, 2017, 12:05:58 pm »
Thanks apav. Will just have to keep an eye on it and give more thought to driving style.

Offline Jerby

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Re: DPF regeneration
« Reply #101 on: February 26, 2017, 10:23:42 am »
A regen ocurs around 250 miles depening on your mpg. Less mpg = more regular regens. The car needs to carry out a full regen before stopping the engine if at all possible. If not it dumps fuel into the oil (hence your increase in oil level). There is no exact mileage that the regen happens and certain parameters need to be met before a regen occurs.
Forscan is your answer. Great bit of kit and its an app.

For those who have to do forced regens or are a town/city driver you have bought the wrong car.

Offline wocky

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Re: Discussions about DPF
« Reply #102 on: May 16, 2017, 02:48:23 pm »
Following on from Rely #84.
I thought I had fixed this DPF problem then 12 months later it came back.
Same problems with Engine in limp mode and DPF and Engine Management Light on.
This time I decided to completely strip down the EGR valve which I was reluctant to do before as I did not know its construction.
The electric motor on the valve is completely separate so 4 screws gets it off the main body with no “bits” to fly off.
What I found was very interesting.
The construction is the same as an intake or exhaust valve.
I could not move it as it was seized with carbon in the valve stem guide.
After some gentle tapping with a hammer and applying carburettor cleaner, I got it to move.
I disassembled it and removed the valve from the guide, cleaned it all so the valve now moved easily.
It has a wire gauze scraper in the end of the guide hole to clean the valve stem which after 80,000 miles had become solid with carbon.
I think when I cleaned it originally still fully assembled I had softened the carbon which enabled the valve to go on working correctly for some time.
After refitting the EGR valve back to the car I did a Manual regen using Forscan.
I have now been using Forscan Lite on my phone to monitor the Engine Parameters.
It turns out that the DPF is regenning correctly every 100 to 110 miles and I notice that when it is doing this the EGR valve is closed.
I would point out the electric motor of the EGR valve only PUSHES OPEN and relies on the spring to return it so the position of the motor in Forscan is not necessarily the position of the valve.
I believe that the fundamental cause of all my problems has been the EGR valve sticking open.
On most occasions my engine lost power then went to limp mode after I had been cruising when the valve probably got stuck open.
I seriously suggest that anyone with DPF problems strip and clean the EGR valve first because the error codes in the Engine management to not tell the root cause only the resulting errors.

Offline TURBOLRF66

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Re: Discussions about DPF
« Reply #103 on: August 18, 2018, 05:10:01 pm »
It should be possible to start a complete regeneration and clear the warning light simply by driving for 10 minutes or so at speeds greater than 40mph.

Can I ask to which engine this refers? I have done much reading on the DPF system and from what I can gather the engine revs have to be over 2000rpm as well as the speed of more than 40mph for the regeneration to occur.

This is what I can remember from the previous forum and others about that refers to my '08 facelift 2.0L Diesel sport.

My cars journey to and from work 5 days a week consists 20 miles on a motorway and then about 5 miles of stop start rush hour traffic so on the motorway runs I ensure the revs are above 2000rpm for as much of the journey as possible before I hit the city traffic.
It had an oil change at a Mazda dealership 2 weeks ago and so far the oil level is holding steady. Let's hope it stays that way!

Hello there

Hope your well

The DPF system of the generation one mazda 6's requires a specific set of parameters for the 'PASSIVE' regeneration cycles to occur. These are as follows
  • The vehicle must be above 40mph ( i know this is quoted already)
  • The vehicle must be in 2nd gear or above
  • The vehicle must be doing 2000 rpm with a tolerance of 0-20%

The above specifics are taken from the official workshop manual exerts - and also if your DPF is above 120% clogged (yes that is correct - mazdas technical theories somehow bypass the natural mathematics of life) this means that 'PASSIVE' regeneration cannot take place and 'FORCED' regeneration will have to take place via a dealer OR if you have the VCM 1 or VCM2 module and required software package.
If 'FORCED' regeneration takes place your engine oil WILL require replacement (DPF 5w-30 ACEA C1, JASO DL1) and ideally you should replace your filter and definitely the crush washer too for the sump plug or your risk sump cracking.

Hope this information helps

Regards

Turbolrf66

Offline apav

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Re: Discussions about DPF
« Reply #104 on: August 19, 2018, 08:21:44 am »
For which generation car and engine is that?

For the second generation 2.0 engine, it is 25mph, 3rd gear and I can check whether there is a rpm threshold. I definitely do not drive at 2K rpm but have no DPF problems.