Author Topic: P2227 - issue in barometric pressure sensor  (Read 141 times)

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Offline waynedavidson2

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P2227 - issue in barometric pressure sensor
« on: January 14, 2020, 11:48:15 am »
good afternoon all,

so i've had my Mazda 8 months now and up until recently its been great (2.2 sport 182hp) however it had its mot and an oil change early november and hasn't been the same since,

before i could hear the turbo spooling up around 1600rpm but now it doesn't start to spin up until around 2100rpm, my local mechanic changed the MAF sensor but that didn't help, then removed and sent the DPF for a clean, still no good, then suggested it could be the turbo vanes sticking or the EGR (ive recently seen a post on here of some pipes from the egr to the inlet manifold that helped me actually locate the EGR, took the pipe off to see how bad it was and discovered the egr has been blanked off so i cant see it being that) i've had some wynns turbo cleaner in the tank which seemed to help slightly but still not as quick as it was at accelerating,

so now i have a bluetooth obd thing and Garage Pro which suggested there is an issue with the Baro sensor, 

my question being, does anyone know where this is actually located (2.2 mazda diagrams seem rare) and would it cause lack of acceleration and the turbo not to kick in until higher up the rev range? also this is my first diesel so dont really know much about them

Offline apav

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Re: P2227 - issue in barometric pressure sensor
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2020, 12:51:29 pm »
Is it something like this?

https://www.google.com/search?q=mazda+6+baro+sensor&client=firefox-b-d&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=3UrP3og3tg8trM%253A%252C7S_SmtJdSCikwM%252C_&vet=1&usg=AI4_-kSkvgFAHf1e5icT85znF7yqpSXI_Q&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjIlaSlm4PnAhXtTRUIHauxDYEQ9QEwAXoECAUQBg#imgrc=3UrP3og3tg8trM:&vet=1

As your car is not stock, all sort of butchering may have happened. You cannot even know whether it runs on the stock map.

But the turbo should spool much earlier than the 1,600 rpm. However, this may has gone off to a different band due to a different map, etc.

These cars are very sensitive with the oil. When the oil goes bad, the turbo dies first. If your turbo has gone bad, it could be from bad oil circulation.

Changing the oil can trigger all sorts of problems because if there is too much "mud" in the engine and the new oil additives put it in motion, they can block something else down the line. Also, a lot of the garage operate on the long established principle "that will do, let's crack on". These engines require an ACEA C1 oil and only that. You notice the difference with the C2 and C3 oils. Even if the garage is honest, who knows what the motor factor sent them, guys also know for cracking on.

Depending on how much mileage you have done from the previous change, you could another oil filter change with a C1 oil. I have no idea how the garage linked the MAF sensor to the turbo spooling.

Removing the DPF and cleaning it, is also something that involves a lot of manhandling. As the EGR is blocked, I would not be surprised if the DPF has been removed as well and there is just a shell there.

https://www.autoblog.com/2016/01/04/symptoms-of-a-bad-or-failing-barometric-sensor/?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS91cmw_c2E9dCZyY3Q9aiZxPSZlc3JjPXMmc291cmNlPXdlYiZjZD0xJnZlZD0yYWhVS0V3aXFpT1dFbm9QbkFoVWltVndLSGJtU0NDTVFGakFBZWdRSUFSQUImdXJsPWh0dHBzJTNBJTJGJTJGd3d3LmF1dG9ibG9nLmNvbSUyRjIwMTYlMkYwMSUyRjA0JTJGc3ltcHRvbXMtb2YtYS1iYWQtb3ItZmFpbGluZy1iYXJvbWV0cmljLXNlbnNvciUyRiZ1c2c9QU92VmF3M3RlU1ZmTWlpWkJiMHZQVVhMaUhFMg&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAHDajyAhjzwhdUuL7yBzfbY_X2tEd43xnCfscC6y_OBSLHRjAIQsa0pRrzauHYF3uzMnZoxKbX4NIbr1-8aKII044Q8PykybdHSWjX-3Na6kUvuGyAIoehQQtbsV68ZF5tirEOA96VBJjLBWO9KqKKFU5u-VCwU8_QzKfniXUOym

Offline waynedavidson2

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Re: P2227 - issue in barometric pressure sensor
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2020, 01:59:07 pm »
thanks for your reply,

yes after discovering the blanking plate i did wonder if any ECU mods have actually been made or not,  as for the DPF i'm assuming it's still there as the people that cleaned it said it was partially blocked (thats what i was told anyway) and charged £200 for the pleasure of cleaning it, if i get chance i might take it off and have a peak,

and yes it does show the symptoms of a bad Baro sensor BUT it just seems odd that it was working fine, loads of power and flew uphills then after the MOT and oil change it was instantly poor, very noticeable when driving away from said garage, i even had to drop to third to get up some inclines,

might have to try another oil change then, even though it was only 2 months ago i've just looked at the oil level and its near the X and smells very diesely which isn't a good sign,

any advise on the best course or action? like sump off and check strainer ect, garage suggested it could be soot blocking pretty much anything from the intake onwards, 


Offline apav

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Re: P2227 - issue in barometric pressure sensor
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2020, 10:32:49 am »
Change the oil and filter. How many miles did you do in 2 months? The level is already at X, so you need the oil change.

I would check with the garage what oil they used. Blocking the DPF is a very easy job. You just need to drive 2-3-5K miles in bad conditions and it is done.

Because your EGR is blocked, the whole emissions system and engine operates is beyond what is normal. You can free and clean the EGR and see whether this makes any difference.

I think the garage did not use C1 oil and you noticed the difference immediately. I bought mine from a franchise which serviced it on delivery. When it was time for the first service, I bought C1 oil and asked a local independent garage to change it. The engine immediately run smoother and it felt more powerful. I never had problems even with the dealer service but the new C1 oil was like you had a different car. There is a chance you went from C1 oil to whatever the garage had.

I would not take the sump off and clean the oil pick up, if I could not do it by myself. Unless you are 100% of the quality of the garage, it is just too risky. If you start a series of very frequent oil changes, you would clean up the engine. You only need to have the guarantee that the injectors are running within their limits and then the engine will remain clean with the fresh oil. The diesely or tar smell in the oil, it is a sign that the oil changes should happen more frequently.

Offline waynedavidson2

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Re: P2227 - issue in barometric pressure sensor
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2020, 11:28:55 am »
that all make interesting reading, that the type of oil used could have such a massive effect on the engine,

i'll purchase my own oil and have a different garage change it for me along with the filter, hopefully that might make a difference like it did for your car,

i suspect last change it was just a standard bulk oil the garage used for all cars,

incidentally i've only done about 1500 miles since the last change, mainly on a roads at or above 40mph,   

Offline apav

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Re: P2227 - issue in barometric pressure sensor
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2020, 11:38:25 am »
Yes the oil on these engines is what kills them. Most of the oil companies have added a legal warning on their search engines that these cars must be fitted with the right oil and only the right oil.

It is a good option to buy your own trusted parts and ask a garage to fit them. Just be cautious because, after having been there, done that, I only found my oil filter sitting at the garage shelf when I was in for the next one.

Yes there is a good chance that the garage just used whatever oil they had. 1,500 miles is not a lot to result in the oil moving from max to X. The road type and the speed matter, but you have to keep driving for long enough to have the engine running hot over some time. A good measure if the distance you need to drive while the car is regenerating. That is easily 15-20 minutes on the lower speeds. So driving 30 minutes or more should be enough to warm up things a bit.

Offline Mazda GJ

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Re: P2227 - issue in barometric pressure sensor
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2020, 09:33:57 pm »
Further to what has been advised already. Suppose my engine similar to yours, couple years younger may be  it's SH1 2.2 diesel ( Mazda 6 GJ). As per above, correct oil spec is important. As you mentioned, MAF probably not related to turbo. But MAP might, it's located on inlet manifold and controls pressure inside manifold and controls turbo too. Try cleaning MAP sensor, only 10 min job but might help. Unless I missing something, I never heard of Baro pressure sensor on Mazda diesel engine. Not claiming to be a mechanic more of DIYer, I thought there are two types of pressures in our engines: vacuum/ negative which is created by vacuum pump fitted on right end of engine and positive pressure which is inside inlet manifold pumped by turbo, not sure if barometric pressure sensor part of the system, I might be wrong. Other thing that probably not many people do, when changing oil is resetting counter. It's done via diagnostic scanner tool or with piece of wire ( one end to ground/ negative other to connector located inside fuse box, ignition on, gas pedal pressed 5 times, it's confirmed by 5 flashes of coil sign on dash). There was short video on YouTube on how it's done. Counter reset updates parameters and informs ECU on oil change.

Offline waynedavidson2

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Re: P2227 - issue in barometric pressure sensor
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2020, 08:09:03 am »
yes i've just read a post about someone cleaning theirs with a toothbrush so was already thinking of trying that if i can find it (new to diesels) i've had a scour of the internet and can't see much about BARO sonsors on there either,

i've got torque pro and a bluetooth obd scanner so i've been trying to monitor certain readings, as far as boost and vacuum go it struggles to get above 8psi on boost but is quite happy to go to 16psi on the vacuum side regularly

as far as the reset, i did that after finding out about it, possibly a few weeks after the oil change,

However, i have now found out some other info from the garage, before the DPF went for the clean they tried to clear it by doing 3 forced regens which didn't work, but i can only imagine the state of the oil now, and it would explain it being at the "X" mark,

so i'll have a look for the MAP sensor and get it booked in for another oil and filter change, see it that helps.

thank you all for you assistance, much appreciated, 

Offline mareng73

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Re: P2227 - issue in barometric pressure sensor
« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2020, 03:54:54 pm »
The MAF  sensor is the Mass Air Flow Sensor, located just after the air filter, and is a series of electronic components and is very susceptible to damage if cleaned with a toothbrush. If it has failed, it manifests itself by the engine not being able to rev under load. To test, disconect the plug on the top (you will get a warning on the dash)  and see if it will run ok under load  and the problem goes away (you may produce a lot of black smoke) if that happens the MAF has failed, if its dirty wash it off with Spray Brake and Clutch cleaner, if still no improvement you need a new one. This sensor controls the air to fuel ratio. As air passes the sensor it cools a component lowering the resistance and this is related to air flow. Included is also a temperature sensor for incoming air, which will effect changes for cold running until the engine warms up, such as the EGR opening allowing hot gasses into the air manifold without it going through the EGR cooler.
The MAP  Manifold Absolute Pressure sensor,    not Barometric pressure sensor, this could be elsewhere, not connected to the engine, may be incorporated with the Ambient  air temp for the dash.   MAP  located lower lhs of inlet manifold. As the pressure in the manifold is relient on the turbo charger, then barometric pressue does not come into it.
The MAP may get carboned up as it is the manifold, but can be removed easy and washed off with C& B cleaner.
I have seen a utube video of oven cleaner being squirted into the intake manifold  to dissolve the carbon, I suppose the MAP sensor location could used and the cleaner being left overnight to work.

The vacuum pump will be used mainly for the brakes and possibly for operating vacuum motor devices on the turbo.
Unless operating at high altitudes I very much doubt that barometric pressure affects the operation of the engine at sea level. Barometric pressure and  temperature has an effect on the  density of the air.
I will look up the operation of the MAP and report back. It may control the boost pressure required for  rpm, fueling , load etc, this is guessing.
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Offline mareng73

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MAP sensor use
« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2020, 04:40:24 pm »
In fuel-injected automotive engines, a manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor is used to continuously monitor the amount of air flowing into the engine, so the computer can calculate air density, adjust the amount of fuel to spray into the combustion chamber and adjust the ignition timing.
( Straight off Google)
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