Author Topic: Mazda 6 Wheels  (Read 908 times)

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Offline J@z

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Mazda 6 Wheels
« on: September 18, 2019, 12:19:42 pm »
Can anyone please confirm what the PCD of the wheels on a Mazda 6 is (I've seen 114 and 114.3)?
is this PCD the same on all Mazda 6's of any age?
Also can anyone please advise the Offset (ET)?
Finally, is there enough clearance (on full lock) on an older ('08) Mazda 6 (OEM 225/45-ZR18 tyres) for 225/45-ZR19 tyres off a newer Mazda 6 (I know it will make the speedo underestimate the speed)?
Tyre                   Sidewall Rolling Rad  Diameter      Circumf.      Revs/km   Diff.
225/40-18           90mm     319mm      637mm       2002mm        500       0.0%
225/45-19          101mm    343mm      685mm       2152mm        465       7.5%
225/40-19           90mm     331mm      663mm       2082mm        480       0.4%

Offline apav

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Re: Mazda 6 Wheels
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2019, 04:32:47 pm »
Yes it is 114.3 and it is the same for all the second generation cars.

The ET is different for each wheel size.

The second generation big wheels are:

225/45ZR18    7.5Jx18 ET60    5x114.3

The third generation big wheels are:

225/45ZR19    7.5Jx19 ET45    5x114.3

The tyres are not used in the calculations.

You need to multiply the new wheel width by 25 and divide by 2 and from all that you subtract the ET of the new wheel.

Then you need to do the same calculation for the old wheel.

You should get 48.75 for the new wheel and 33.75 for the old wheel.

You subtract the old wheel figure from the new wheel figure and you get 15mm.

This is your max change of the track.

The second generation car runs from 1460 to 1560mm, back and front is the same size.

From that you can add a 2% change which turns out to be between 2.92cm to 3.12cm.

So you can play from 14.6mm to 15.6mm.

As the 15mm of the difference of the wheels is very close to that, you are just on the margin.

I think there are second generation car photos online with the third generation car wheels.

So others have done it and so besides the figures, everything must be out of touching something.

But who knows what happens when it is loaded or flies through a bombed road.

As the 7.5j wheel is limited to 225 tyres, your new tyres should be 225/40 and not the 225/45 that will already be fitted.

Maybe you could run the old tyres and keep rotating them if you do not want to waste them and then hand over the big guineas for a set of 4 tyres of the right size.

Post some photos and experiences when it is done.

Offline J@z

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Re: Mazda 6 Wheels
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2019, 09:44:07 pm »
Apav,
Brilliant, thanks.  That was exactly the kind of technical information I was looking for.  It sounds as though fitting Series 3 wheels to a Series 2 is a bit 'marginal'.  I can see, using the 45 profile tyres for a while and rotating them to even the wear and then replacing all four at the same time with 40 profile tyres would work for bringing the rolling radius and revs per mile back close to the original.
I'm a little more concerned about the difference in the offset.  The car handles quite nicely as it stands, but would the different offset spoil the handling, or tend to make it 'tramline'?

Offline apav

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Re: Mazda 6 Wheels
« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2019, 03:50:55 pm »
No the offset should not affect the handling once you put on the right dimension of tyres.

You get increased danger from ruts with extra width, but your width remains the same, so you should not notice much difference.

You may end up with more weight per corner for the 19inch wheels and so a 10 years suspension part, may need an overhaul sooner than later, but you have to drive to find out about that.

All these Corsas sitting on XXX inch wheels in car parks and under bridges, do all the mileage of the world not to worry about anything like wear.

Most of the people add on the big wheels for the looks. The 17inch on the second generation car is the right call between comfort and handling.

But the third generation car comes with two different wheelbases. The sedan is a new longer wheelbase, while the estate is the old second generation dimension.

They still fit 19inch wheels to both of them but all the online reviews mention that the estate handles better because of the shorter wheelbase.

So I suppose the extra 10cm of the sedan wheelbase will not do any good in trying to correct inside the corner but the 19inch wheel will look better on the image front.

I think jumping from the 17 inch to the 19 inch wheels may be interesting in winter and/or wet conditions, so keep in that mind that if you want to drive all year around.