Author Topic: Thinking about buying a Mazda  (Read 655 times)

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Offline Walt2104

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Thinking about buying a Mazda
« on: July 26, 2018, 06:55:12 am »
Newby to this group
Presently have a Jaguar XE with loads of toys but never had a car with so many rattles. This is a replacement for an original one that was replaced due to so many faults the warranty exceeded the cost of the car.
Anyway had a quick look at the GT 2.5l petrol as this is the car that matches most of my specifications. Guess it’s too new a model for any reviews out there but would appreciate any comments before I seriously investigate a purchase.

Thanks

Les

Offline apav

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Re: Thinking about buying a Mazda
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2018, 07:56:02 am »
As you have experienced with your current car, you should never buy a car during the first two years of production. Let it run for a while with other beta testers and then go ahead with it after you have found out what problems it has and you have decided that you are lucky to live with them.

On the other hand, I do not think the current 6 will be in production for more than 2 years. But at least wait for 1 year.

How did you manage to swap the car? Is it yours or is it a rental/PCP/finance? With Mazda, a lot of people had their engines rebuilt with diesel cars of the second and the third generation but Mazda never gave them a new car. I suppose it is all different if you come from a finance perspective as it is the interest of the finance company to have a roadworthy car.

Also, at £31K advertised price, you are so close to cars of bigger size. You pay 1/3 extra over the basic car to get all these extras but I am not sure somebody will pay for them when you want to resell it. It will be a good thing to have these extras if you want to run it to the ground, so that you feel that you drive a modern car, but on the other hand, a nearly new 6 costs £16K and so you can get one of the current generation and when the new generation car is introduced, you can buy again another nearly new and still have spent less than the money of the top version. I think in the mind of the majority of the buyers, the 6 will always be the £16K car and not the £31K.

So overall you have to decide whether the risk of getting an untested engine is worthy and whether you should pay such premium.

Offline Walt2104

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Re: Thinking about buying a Mazda
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2018, 08:56:41 am »
Thanks for the info. I was under the impression that the 2.5 petrol had been out there in the real world for some time with the American version also now having a turbo added. I would agree that after past experience never buy a new model but again is this one not tried and tested with cosmetic improvements.
Was not thinking of changing until Q2 next year, but also looking at Superb L&K or even the Mondeo Vignale. Premium manufacturers are not what they are always cracked up to be!

Offline apav

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Re: Thinking about buying a Mazda
« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2018, 12:23:05 pm »
I think it is a completely new engine in its current setting and yes while evolution exists, this does not always work out in practice, e.g. the second generation 2.2 diesel timing chain problems. So you should assume that it is a brand new engine.

There is a recall for the third generation car for the rear brake calipers of the current car but this was mainly on the first cars. However, a lot of people have to replace them outside the recall set of cars. I am not sure whether this design feature has been fixed.

You have a lot of time to do your research about potential problems in these cars. All cars will develop some but as long you can afford to keep it in a good condition, that is then part of the ownership cost.

I think the premium cars are a size smaller that such segment D car if you go for the same wheelbase, or you get them in bigger size with of course longer wheelbase. There should be a difference in something, let that be quality or perceived quality, driving experience or luxury, because they manage to keep selling very quickly and I do not think it is only the brand image that makes them sell. On the other hand, some people go for a nearly new car instead of a new and in this scenario you can check the best car you like in segment D, e.g. you go for the 6, and then you realise that you can search Auto Trader and find nearly new cars, i.e. less than 1 year old, less than 10K miles on the close, which usually turn out to be less than 6 months and less than 6K miles, of segment E for the same money as a brand new 6.

So it becomes tricky, some people will go for the nearly new 5 series or E Class, instead of a brand new 6. I think it is worthy to go one size up every time you change the car and if you let a couple of generations to go in between, the difference will be massive. On the other hand, the same cost brand new 6 will be cheaper to maintain than the nearly new E or 5 because these cost 50% tag price and so everything will be more expensive with them. And so some people settle for the same size of car to avoid the extra costs. I think either of them will end up costing you similar money if you keep them for very long.

Offline aeroadster

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Re: Thinking about buying a Mazda
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2018, 12:22:35 am »
Just to correct the speculation as to whether the 2.5litre normally aspirated engine is completely new, and what constitutes a brand new engine, lets try to be clear about what is new and what is not, so you can decide for yourself.

The updated Mazda6 introduced at the Los Angeles Auto Show this past week offers two powertrain options in the US: an upgraded SKYACTIV-G 2.5 naturally aspirated engine and the turbocharged SKYACTIV-G 2.5T engine, first unveiled at the 2015 LA Auto Show for the 2016 CX-9.

For 2016 (in the Japanese, US and AUS markets) Mazda6’s 2.5-liter, four-cylinder engine that first appeared in 2013 comes with a number of upgrades:
1) Employing the tried and tested piston dampening technology that aim to reduce internal friction and improve efficiency across all rpm, and also adds a greater level of refinement.
2) A new technology that is unique to Mazda in North America is cylinder deactivation in a four-cylinder engine.  The outside two cylinders can shut down when the vehicle is operated at steady speeds between 25 and 50 mph, where valves are controlled by a switch in the hydraulic lash adjusters that in turn stop the valves from moving.  All four cylinders work instantaneously when needed for maximum performance. A centrifugal pendulum has been adopted in the torque converter of the six-speed SKYACTIV-DRIVE automatic transmission, counterbalancing any vibration that might otherwise be felt when running on two cylinders. The result is an imperceptible switchover between two- and four-cylinder modes.

So for the normally aspirated engine that you're interested in, in my view as an engineer, the engine is fundamentally the same, but the control systems are doing something smart in order to improve fuel economy.

For those who are exceedingly sceptical, these engines are now publicly tried and tested.  Given there's no signs of issues or problems in the two years that they've been on sale, I would say they are pretty robust, but that's not surprising considering the engine block is in its current iteration unchanged for several years.
 
There seems to be a perception from some quarters that car manufacturers don't do enough to test their engines, but believe me having been on the front line, all mainstream manufacturers undergo stress testing beyond abnormal operating conditions

Just to make yet another point regarding the Mk2 GH series 2.2 diesel timing chain....whilst Mazda may not publicly admit it, they were too busy working on the future Skyactiv-D and G range of engines, to focus enough time on making a decent timing chain and tensioner combo for their MZR 2.2 diesel, which was a slightly rushed job as they wanted to develop an engine to meet the Euro 5 emissions standards in 2008.  They did not address the chain issue as the GH model was only intended to be around until 2012/13. 

Allegedly the model most likely to be affected was he short-lived 185bhp 2.2 MZR diesel (which is the car I have), and the 2010 - 2012 180bhp 2.2 diesel was not afflicted in the same way.  Unfortunately for Mazda, this problem has stuck with them and is repeatedly discussed (often with lots of misinterpretation/misunderstanding) so that all of a sudden, their product is deemed risky.

I've just replaced my timing chain at 151,000 miles, and I'm monitoring the timing chain stretch on a weekly basis so I can better predict the rate of stretch.  This issue would not stop me buying the latest generation of Mazda 6.

I've seen it first hand and test driven it already.  It's a great car in terms of build quality and finish and I would say it is comparable to a BMW,  Audi or Mercedes.  Again, I speak with first hand experience  of working in the de-fleet and re-marketing industry.  I've seen tens of thousands of these premium segment cars between the age of 6months to 4years, and so many of them rattle and the interiors don't wear so well in comparison with my 2009 sport luxury model.

The new 6 is noticeably quieter than the outgoing model thanks to acoustic glass and better use of sound dampening materials, and is as quiet as an Audi A4, which is quieter than a Merc C class and BMW 3 or 4 series.

The driving position and handling is great, and the standard features are much higher than its competitors, with the excellent HUD, city brake, RVM, front and rear safety braking, adaptive cruise control and g-vectoring available on all models.  Mazda also don't have a habit of over-exaggerating their fuel economy figures, where some of other German, Japanese and British marques seem to be 20% - 35% off their figures.

When the time is right, I'll be driving the 2.5litre tourer if I don't import a CX8 or CX9 from Australia.


Offline Walt2104

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Re: Thinking about buying a Mazda
« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2018, 07:45:51 am »
Thanks for all your comments.
Having previously been bitten by a new model, I think whilst looking now change will be in 2019.
Just in case there are any bugs.....

Offline apav

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Re: Thinking about buying a Mazda
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2018, 11:59:54 am »
If they start deliveries of the facelift from 9/2018, then you should expect that the car will remain the same, with no improvements, until 9/2019.

Offline Walt2104

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Re: Thinking about buying a Mazda
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2018, 08:09:32 am »
Had a look at the GT Sport Diesel at the weekend. Looks very well finished. Waiting for a Petrol to arrive for a test drive. Has anyone driven a 2.5 Petrol yet?