Author Topic: Nice car, but....  (Read 8359 times)

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Offline bazzamf

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Re: Nice car, but....
« Reply #15 on: September 03, 2016, 11:59:46 am »
My previous first generation 6, which I had from new, had the same rust issues, which began to show after about 6 years. I now have a second generation car which is just over six years old and no rust issues so far. Because this car is black, I have tended to use the waterless car cleaning products, which I think has helped to protect the bodywork.

Offline slavikost

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Re: Nice car, but....
« Reply #16 on: September 12, 2016, 12:56:59 am »
My Mazda is exactly the same dark blue colour like the car on the photos few posts above and I think my stone chips are even more.We all know Japanese people are very smart-why is so difficult for them to use the same colour primer under the paint coat.You don`t have to be genius to figure it out.
Roof is not so bad as the bonnet but many spots as well.And I don`t know why but on the roof they are bigger and most of them rusty.How the stones from the road are not damaging the windscreen but just the roof after it is completely mystery for me as well.The car is now around 115 000 miles but even for these miles this is toooo much white on the dark surface.I have never owned car with rubbish paint like this.When I sold my previous car(it was 12 years old Renault Laguna with 125000 miles on the clock)the paint was with 0 stone chips.I still have the photos from the selling advert.It only had a little bit pealing of the clear coat around the front door handles(but virtually invisible if I dont point your attention at that spot).
 I love my mazda and everybody can agree it is beautiful car.But because of this white spots it is true that if the car is dirty is more pleasant for the eye.I am really thinking to paint the whole car.
I like the facelift  of third generation(2015-2016) but just because of problematic paint I dont think I will go for it.Or compromise and buy white car????

Offline PanPilot

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Re: Nice car, but....
« Reply #17 on: September 20, 2016, 07:53:52 am »
 White and rust don't go together... not on cars anyway. Perhaps you should consider a sort of orangey-brown!

 I urge everyone to look very closely - and I mean VERY closely, get the step ladders out - for stone chips on the roof. I have just found two more tiny chips with rusty centres, and signs of rust tracking under the paint (it looks like fine threads, or strands of a cobweb; which is why it's sometimes called spidering). If you find any, tackle them *now*, don't delay. Once a rust particle gets under the paint, it brings all of its friends to the party!

 I have been given a useful tip from a guy who does stone chips for a living.
First get yourself a touch-in kit from Mazda, they are only about a fiver, they seem to sell a lot for some reason.
Get some strong cheapex reading specs, you will do a better job. (I use +4.0, £3.99 from the supermarket).
Make sure it is absolutely bone dry before you start, if necessary use the wife's hairdryer on its lowest setting to gently warm the area first.
Now tear the corners off a sheet of kitchen roll to make triangles about 70mm, twisted to a fine point, and use that instead of a brush. Pick up a small amount of paint on the pointed end, and 'dot' paint into the chip, slowly working around the edges inwards to the centre. Take your time and avoid the temptation to put too much paint on in one go, but be careful not to leave any pinholes. You may have to return to it after an hour or two and fill in a bit. The more care you take, the less obvious the repair will be.

It works a treat. Shame I have to do it so frequently, though...

Offline mareng73

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Re: Nice car, but....
« Reply #18 on: March 08, 2017, 10:35:21 am »
If the change to waterbased paints was because of the greens pressure,  what about the energy required to build  a new car, scrap a nearly new one  and  the oil used for all the new plastic parts. It doesn't really add up.  Global warming is a load of tosh,  the world has been going through this thermal cycle since it came out the big bang, it is just a big stick that gvts can use  to control the masses with fear.
Build a car to last, reduce the output of car factories , channel the labour into other manufacturing . Perhaps shareholders of car manufacturers should not be so  greedy.
Previous Cars
Rover 45 TDI
Rover 400 DI
Nissan 200SX
TR7
TR Spitfire

Offline ColinB

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Re: Nice car, but....
« Reply #19 on: March 08, 2017, 09:23:11 pm »
I believe that the change to waterbased paints was to reduce the volatiles in the solvents. The same reasoning has been applied to domestic paints which is why they are now all 'quick dry' but never get really hard and so are less durable with a poorer finish than traditional paints. So with cars, the old cellulose finish would have shrugged off stone chip strikes which now dig holes into the thinner softer paint and provide the opportunity for rust to develop. It is called progress I think.

Offline Willpower

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Re: Nice car, but....
« Reply #20 on: March 08, 2017, 10:11:53 pm »
I believe that weight conservation was also an element towards the change of paint materials from cellulose to water based.
An average family car was hauling around about 25-30 lbs. of paint weight. Whereas with the e-coat, primer, light filler (if any), two base coats, and the standard 3 clear coats you end up between 6-15 lbs, a considerable reduction.

Further consideration included a reduction in costs for water based paint and ease of application. Taken with the environment aspect (lack of solvents), then  to the Mazda exec's it must have been a no brainer to change over.
The problem with any step change like this is the lack of data regarding longevity and FW&T.   But Mazda are not the only company to go this route. I understand from acquaintances that Fiat and Renault cars also suffer the same problems. 
Look at life through the windscreen, not the rearview mirror.

Offline PanPilot

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Re: Nice car, but....
« Reply #21 on: March 21, 2017, 07:12:02 am »
 Yes, I suspect you're right in saying it's not just a Mazda problem. I was passing the coachworks recently, so on a whim I dropped in to ask advice about the rust spots. To paraphrase what I was told: " Oh, that's not bad... I would expect your typical Audi or BMW to be worse at this mileage. We do a lot of them...". The guy implied the difference is that they cover at least part of the cost, unlike Mazda.